Selected Works

History
By legitimizing and intensifying bigotry, and insisting that only white Protestants could be “true Americans,” a revived and mainstream Klan in the 1920s left a troubling legacy that demands a reexamination today.
When Irish orphans were placed in Mexican-American homes in Arizona in 1904, Anglos responded by kidnapping them.
How public and private institutions attempted to copy with child abuse and violence against women.
Reproduction control has been controversial in the US for 150 years, and this book explains why.
Biography
The life of the great photographer Dorothea Lange
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Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women's Movements


Purchase at Powell's

Eschewing the conventional wisdom that places the origins of the American women's movement in the nostalgic glow of the late 1960s, traces the beginnings of this seminal American social movement to the 1920s, in the process creating an expanded, historical narrative that dramatically rewrites a century of American women's history. Also challenging the contemporary "lean-in," trickle-down feminist philosophy and asserting that women's histories all too often depoliticize politics, labor issues, and divergent economic circumstances, Dorothy Sue Cobble, Linda Gordon, and Astrid Henry demonstrate that the post-Suffrage women's movement focused on exploitation of women in the workplace as well as on inherent sexual rights. The authors carefully revise our "wave" vision of feminism, which previously suggested that there were clear breaks and sharp divisions within these media-driven "waves." Showing how history books have obscured the notable activism by working-class and minority women in the past, provides a much-needed corrective.